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Dementia Care Varies as the Disease Progresses

Dementia Care Varies as the Disease Progresses

As any agency offering exceptional home care in Augusta, Georgia will tell you, people with Alzheimer’s disease or other forms of dementia may have different needs at different points in time, depending on the progression of their ailment. Because of this, caring for dementia patients poses a lot of challenges. If someone you love has dementia as well, you might want to consider in-home care to make things easier and more convenient for both you and your loved ones.

Dementia is a brain disorder which generally makes it more and more challenging for your loved ones to remember things, communicate with other people, think clearly, and take care of themselves. It can even cause mood swings and change the personality and behavior of your family members. If you’re still not convinced, and you’re wondering how your family members’ home care needs will specifically vary through the progression of their disease, let us at Zena Home Care show you, using Alzheimer’s disease as an example.

There are three stages of Alzheimer’s disease: early stage, middle stage, and late stage. In early-stage Alzheimer’s, your relatives are generally still very independent since they may only be dealing with simple memory lapses. Despite this, it is crucial that you make care plans for the future as early as this time. The middle stage of Alzheimer’s disease will cause your loved ones to require senior care in Georgia as they begin to demonstrate memory loss, erratic behavior and mood, and difficulty with physical movements. Lastly, the late stage will lead your family members to require intensive care as it is expected that they will become unable to process information at this stage.

As a result, it might be a good idea to get the assistance of qualified nurses or trained caregivers for your relatives to enable them to enjoy quality home health in Georgia in spite of their conditions. Should you have concerns, don’t hesitate to get in touch.

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